Annuals

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Jerusalem Cherry

We believe this is a plant, native to Peru and Ecuador, they can survive frosts and cold weather outdoors, and is also grown as a houseplant. Jerusalem Cherries should be planted in a rich, well drained potting soil, and kept moist during their active growing cycle. They grow best in a bright, sunny window. (south facing)Feed with a liquid 5-10-5 'blooming houseplant' fertilizer every two weeks while the plant is growing vigorously.
Discontinue feeding as soon as your plant has finished blooming. After all the 'cherries' have dropped, cut your plant back drastically, and next spring, after all danger of frost has passed, plant it outside in a partly sunny part of your garden. Please note: These are related to tomatoes but are highly poisonous to dogs, cats, and some birds. Do not eat them!

By | 2016-04-11T01:27:01+00:00 April 11th, 2016|Annuals|0 Comments

Cutting Back

We would recommend you cut back all the stems by 1/2, while doing so look at the where you cut and see if you see any 'green ' within , if not cut back till you do. We know this sounds harsh but when a plant is in stress one of the best ways to assist it is to lighten it's load so to speak. Also you must feed it, a good liquid seaweed food is the best, and should be used every 2 weeks, all of your plants will benefit from this regular feeding as well. Things with high numbers like 15-15-15 will only fry it if it's already struggling. It needs light and with the weather being mild right now being out side is a good idea. But make sure it receiving water every day. If the pot seems crowded it might need water twice a day, or you could always move it into a larger container.

By | 2016-04-10T13:05:04+00:00 April 10th, 2016|Annuals|0 Comments

Begonia

We are not positive because we cannot see the leaves in detail, but the flowers resemble a species of Begonia.If it is a species of Begonia, it belongs to a large family of plants, native to many tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Outdoors, most grow best in pots in filtered shade, with sterile, rich, porous, fast-draining soil commercially available at your local garden center (not native soil from the garden), regular but light feeding with a slow release or organic fertilizer and enough water to keep soil moist but not soggy. Most thrive as indoor plants, in greenhouse, or under lath. Almost all require at least moderate humidity. Most can be propagated easily from leaf, stem, or rhizome cuttings if it is a Begonia, but we cannot be sure at this stage.

By | 2016-04-10T05:37:13+00:00 April 10th, 2016|Annuals|0 Comments

Bed Of Nails

We think the leaves resemble the Solanum quitoense, also known as the bed of nails (for its spines on the leaves) or naranjilla plant. It's in the same family of plants as the tomato.This is a subtropical perennial plant from northwestern South America. Does best in temperatures around 65 degrees F. and cannot tolerate temperatures in the 80s. Also prefers well draining soil, regular water and feed with a slow release or organic fertilizer formulated for fruiting plants especially during it growth and fruiting cycles Bears orange-colored 2 inch fruits, but do not eat unless positively identified by a horticulturist at your local garden center or botanic garden and only if you are positive that no chemical insecticide or fungicide has been sprayed on or near the plant.

By | 2016-04-05T17:46:23+00:00 April 5th, 2016|Annuals|0 Comments

Browned Foliage

The brown foliage on your cleome could be caused by several problems. I'll list them and you can decide what might fit. (Sometimes with plants we can only guess...if only they could talk!)
1. Drying out in between watering. Since the other plants are OK this probably isn't it. 2. Slugs, snails, earwigs or other critters strip the stem near the bottom - look closely at the lower stem to see if it's been scraped/eaten away. 3. Fertilizer burn. If any one plant gets too much synthetic fertilizer, either applied to the plant itself or to roots, it can cause browning and death. 4. Hit with hot water. Sometimes we turn on the hose and don't realize that the first water that comes out is scalding hot from the sun. This can cause the plants to die.

By | 2016-04-05T10:24:09+00:00 April 5th, 2016|Annuals|0 Comments

Wild Cucumber

A vining native annual in the cucumber or gourd family (Cucurbitaceae), wild cucumber is often overlooked until it is large and sometimes has engulfed the other plants it is growing on. It occurs throughout much of North America and produces a large leaf with jagged edges. A fast growing, warm season annual, wild cucumber grows from seed each year, germinating after the last frost. The branching vines can grow up to 25' or 30' long, climbing onto other foliage with curling, 3-forked tendrils. Despite the common name, the fruits are not edible, and can cause burning reactions in some people. The pods can be used in dried flower arrangements. An attractive native plant, it is generally considered a weed when climbing on planted trees because of its aggressive growth.

By | 2016-04-03T22:04:03+00:00 April 3rd, 2016|Annuals|0 Comments

Petunia Problem And Insects

We think you probably have two or more issues here. The tiny white bugs are whitefly, a sucking insect. You can spray the plant with insecticidal soap to manage them. Whitefly alone won't cause the browning seen here, however, and this is probably caused by the plant drying out in between waterings. Be sure to water well in the AM and if the weather is hot or sunny again in the late afternoon, trying to direct the water into the pot without wetting the foliage. (Frequent splashing of foliage leads to fungal problems.) Also, be sure your petunias are fertilized throughout the entire summer, either with a liquid used according to directions or a time-release product applied in June and mid-August. Ask at your garden center for recommendations.

By | 2016-04-01T06:47:57+00:00 April 1st, 2016|Annuals|0 Comments

Seedling Problem

There are several things that might be causing this problem with your arugula seedlings. First, we suspect the seedlings may be drying out too much between waterings. Drying out is easily done if they are still in flats, 6-packs, or other situations where the roots are becoming root-bound/too crowded. Thin out the seedlings so they are not crowded as per instructions on the seed packet It might also be a case of over-fertilizing. At this seedling stage you should be feeding at half strength no more than every other time you water. Also is the container in full sun and does the container have drainage holes. Arugula need full sun and excellent drainage. Finally, seedlings need very well draining commercial and sterile potting soil - not soil from the garden. Hope these tips help you.

By | 2016-03-29T06:35:43+00:00 March 29th, 2016|Annuals|0 Comments

Sunflower Problem

There are two possible causes. One is a rust fungus infection which is common on sunflowers. It is a particular problem when the weather is hot and humid or the plants receive overhead watering. Remove the affected leaves and be careful to water only the soil.
The other possibility is a small, piercing insect. There are a number of tiny moths which pierce the leaf of sunflowers and lay eggs. If that is the case you will soon see tiny tracks as the small larvae eat through portions of the leaf. These insects are hard to control and rarley cause more than cosmetic damage.
They have no flowered because they are too small. Once there is enough plant, meaning they have grown large enough to support flowering, they will do so.

By | 2016-03-27T18:46:57+00:00 March 27th, 2016|Annuals|0 Comments

Wild Cucumber

A vining native annual in the cucumber or gourd family (Cucurbitaceae), wild cucumber is often overlooked until it is large and sometimes has engulfed the other plants it is growing on. It occurs throughout much of North America, certainly in the upper Midwest. A fast growing, warm season annual, wild cucumber grows from seed each year, germinating after the last frost. The branching vines can grow up to 25' or 30' long, climbing onto other foliage with curling, 3-forked tendrils. Despite the common name, the fruits are not edible, and can cause burning reactions in some people. The pods can be used in dried flower arrangements. An attractive native plant, it is generally considered a weed when climbing on planted trees because of its aggressive growth.

By | 2016-03-27T17:25:26+00:00 March 27th, 2016|Annuals|0 Comments