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Brown Edges

We are not entirely certain what is wrong here but there are two things to consider. One, house plants that are watered too often, or with poor drainage, or are over fertilized, often show the pattern that is on your plant. Water only when the soil is dry to the touch, never fertilize more than once a month and then only lightly, and be double sure the drainage is excellent and there is no water ponding around the roots.
Two, if your water has high salt content, or high floride or chlorine content, house plants can show this kind of edge burning on the leaf. If you suspect this is the problem, simply let the water you plan to use for watering sit overnight before you apply it to the plant.
Suggest you may also want to consult a local nursery for more detailed information.

By | 2016-04-07T22:36:25-07:00 April 7th, 2016|House Plants|0 Comments

Croton

Your plant appears to be a Croton, a tropical plant prized for its amazing variation in contrasting colors and markings. Outdoors where there is no frost, needs rich, well-draining soil, full sun, and fertilizer twice a year if you desire new growth. Does not tolerate freezing temperatures. Crotons have a wide variety of variegation possibilities, ranging from green with pink ribs and spots to flecked with yellow or wildly colored with red and yellow and even dark
green. There are even new leaf shapes and sizes. Generally more intense sunlight brings out
more intense variegation. Also popular as a houseplant - indoors, does best in bright indirect light, regular water and feed with a slow release or organic fertilizer formulated for container houseplants.

By | 2016-04-07T21:08:32-07:00 April 7th, 2016|House Plants|0 Comments

Lucky Bamboo

This appears to be the plant known as lucky bamboo, an easy house plant that is often sold singly or in bundled groups with roots growing in water or well-draining potting soil. It's a Chinese favorite because it supposedly brings good luck to the homeowner. Slender leaves take bright indirect light. Not really a bamboo but a Dracaena. Water regularly but do not allow plant to sit in water as this may lead to root rot and feed with a slow release or organic fertilizer formulated for container plants about once a month to stimulate new growth. Hopefully, you planted the Dracaena at the same level as it was in its previous container and used a commercial, sterile, well-draining potting soil. Also make sure the pot has drainage holes.

By | 2016-04-07T13:46:01-07:00 April 7th, 2016|House Plants|0 Comments

Draceana Problem

Dracaenas are especially sensitive to fluoride and chlorine in the water and the browning may be due to this. Chlorine can be eliminated from water by letting the water sit out overnight. However, if you water is treated with fluoride, there's not much you can do short of installing an appropriate filter and/or growing less sensitive plants. It would help that the plant should be in full sun, not part sun. I would also suggest that you repot it into a pot that is slightly broader and has a drain hole. Use potting mix, not garden soil. When watering you should water it until the water runs out the bottom of the pot. Let drain for an hour then put it back in the usual place. Water when the top 2 inches are dry by sticking your finger in as deep as the second knuckle.

By | 2016-04-07T09:05:18-07:00 April 7th, 2016|House Plants|0 Comments

Schefflera

Sorry it took some time to get to your Schefflera problem, and unfortunately its hard to say. It looks like it could be a number of different things from nutrient deficiency, leaf spot fungus, or a virus. I've included a couple of links that might help you. It also looks like the plant may be in a pot too small for it? If you don't fertilize the plant, you can try that (although the affected leaves may not recover, you may avoid further issues); however don't over-fertilize! A general tropical or houseplant fertilizer should be fine, and follow the label directions. Make sure you are not watering over-head with very cold or warm water. http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/3000/3068.html AND http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/pests/plant_pests/indoor/hgic2251.html

By | 2016-04-06T11:45:46-07:00 April 6th, 2016|House Plants|0 Comments

Moth Orchid

The photo is a bit distant, but the top left and middle plants are moth orchids. Phalaenopsis is one of the easiest orchids to grow indoors. To get it to rebloom, make sure it gets enough light (bright east or west window), but not direct sunlight and feed with a slow release or organic fertilizer formulated for orchids. It does not tolerate temperatures below 60-65 degrees F. When in bud or bloom, the plant must be kept above 65 degrees or the buds will turn yellow and drop. Do not overwater and water at the base of the plant rather than overhead. Also do not allow to sit in water as this leads to root rot. Water until it flows out the drainage holes in the bottom before setting it another container if it is in a pot within a pot.

By | 2016-04-06T05:46:07-07:00 April 6th, 2016|House Plants|0 Comments

Moth Orchid

The flowers are a bit hard to see the details straight on from this picture. However from the foliage we feel this is a Phalaenopsis. Phalaenopsis s one of the easiest orchids to grow indoors. To get it to rebloom, make sure it gets enough light (bright east or west window) and feed with a bloom booster fertilizer (a fertilizer with a higher middle number or a slow-release fertilizer formulated for orchids). It does not tolerate temperatures below 60-65 degrees F. When in bud or bloom, the plant must be kept above 65 degrees or the buds will turn yellow and drop. Do not overwater. Do not allow to sit in water as this leads to root rot. Water until it flows out the drainage holes in the bottom before setting it another container if it is in a pot within a pot.

By | 2016-04-06T00:02:27-07:00 April 6th, 2016|House Plants|0 Comments

Boston Fern Problem

Your Boston Fern needs bright indirect light (not just artificial light), regular water but do not allow it to sit in water as this may lead to root rot and a slow release fertilizer formulated for container plants. Outdoors does very well in partial to full shade, but bring indoors if winter frost or hot dry heat is common. We think the most important problem is low light and low humidity. Also, keep the plant moist but not soggy and add fertilizer to the water monthly. Do not place near a heating or air conditioning vent. Can also set up a humidity tray - a saucer filled with gravel/decorative rocks, fill with water and set the plant on top of a brick so it is not in the water - this increases the humidity by about 70% around your plant. It works great!

By | 2016-04-04T20:11:10-07:00 April 4th, 2016|House Plants|0 Comments

Golden Pothos

Your houseplant is a hybrid variegated variety of a vining Pothos. Provide bright indirect light, regular water and feed with a slow-release fertilizer formulated for container plants. Do not allow plant to sit in water because it may lead to root rot. Water when the soil feels dry down to the first knuckle. Pothos is also one of the houseplants known to benefit air quality indoors. For optimum health, keep any houseplant away from heater/air conditioning vents. Yours seems to be in a location that does not receive enough light. Try an area that gets better indoor light and give it a good soaking in the sink allowing the water to drain out thoroughly before returning to its location along with a good slow release or organic fertilizer.

By | 2016-04-03T09:49:08-07:00 April 3rd, 2016|House Plants|0 Comments

Coleus Issue

First of all, thank you for the excellent follow-up picture. It is quite helpful. Good luck with the plant.
This may be bacterial. That would normally occur if the plant were quite stressed. You have it under lights, but how far are the lights from the plant? They should be no more than 12-18" above the foliage. Also, if the plant is quite dense, the air circulation may not be adequate which encourages all the diseases. Perhaps you could pluck all the diseased leaves, fertilize at 1/2 strength and cut back on the water. Coleus as a houseplant is a bit iffy at best and there is not a lot of good photosynthetic area on the really nicely variegated leaves. Warmth is also a factor. They are happiest at 50 degrees or more and start to have problems at 40.

By | 2016-04-03T02:39:16-07:00 April 3rd, 2016|House Plants|0 Comments