Perennials

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Cymbidium Orchid

Your lovely flower is a Cymbidium orchid of which there are many, many species and cultivars. If you have ever attended an orchid show, you will be amazed at the array of Cymbidiums in all shapes, sizes, colors, etc. As a plant indoors, it needs bright indiirect light, regular water but make sure the water drains out - do not allow the plants to sit in water as this leads to root rot, and feed with a slow release fertilizer formulated for blooming container plants. After you have enjoyed the flowering spikes and the flowers are spent, it would be best to place outdoors in full sun or partial sun. When temperatures dip in winter, that will signal your cymbidium to form flowering spikes again, but does not tolerate frost.

By | 2016-04-06T19:45:51-07:00 April 6th, 2016|Perennials|0 Comments

Bouncing Bet Soapwort

Easily grown in average, dry to medium, well-drained soil in full sun. Tolerates poor rocky or sandy soils. Tends to flop when grown in rich soils. Spreads by rhizomes, but is not as aggressive as the species. Deadhead spent flowers to prolong bloom period. This cultivar does not come true from seed and should be propagated by division in either spring or autumn.'Flore-pleno' is a double-flowered soapwort or bouncing bet cultivar which grows to 2' tall on stiff, unbranched stems.

Europeans originally introduced S. officinalis into America in colonial times. They mixed plant sap from the stems and roots with water to form a lathery soap, hence the common names of soapwort and latherwort. Bouncing bet (bet is short for Bess) is an old term from England which means washerwoman.

By | 2016-04-06T15:55:30-07:00 April 6th, 2016|Perennials|0 Comments

Pitcher Plant

This appears to be a pot of pitcher plants. Sarracenias are one of the several exotic and fascinating carnivorous plants whose prey-trapping mechanism features a deep cavity filled with liquid known as a pitfall trap. Sarracenia grows best outdoors as a container or potted plant. It makes an excellent addition to any sunny deck or patio. You may also grow it in a pond or fountain, but keep the crown of the plant above water. Because of its specific soil requirements, avoid planting it directly into the ground, unless you have created a specific type of bog garden. During the growing season, grow your pitcher plant outside in full sun. Provide 6 or more hours of direct sunlight for vigorous growth. For more info, see: http://www.growcarnivorousplants.com/Articles.asp?ID=258

By | 2016-04-06T14:17:29-07:00 April 6th, 2016|Perennials|0 Comments

Gardenia Problem

As an evergreen shrub, it is normal for older leaves of a gardenia to turn yellow and drop. This typically occurs during early spring before new growth appears.
If chlorosis (leaf yellowing with veins still green) is present now or occurs at other times of the year and there is no evidence of insect pests or disease, there may be an environmental or cultural factor causing yellow foliage. Gardenias are acid-loving plants that grow best in a acid (low pH) soil. Iron is an essential nutrient and if the soil pH is above 7.0, the iron may be in a form that is not available to the plant. It may be necessary to apply iron if the leaves are chlorotic, but in the long run, it's good to know that there are fertilizers made specifically for acid loving plants like these.

By | 2016-04-05T11:24:06-07:00 April 5th, 2016|Perennials|0 Comments

Cineraria

Your plant is likely known as a Cineraria, but is really Pericallis x hybrida (also Senecio x hybrida 'Senetti'), prized for its colorful flowers in shady areas or on a patio. Will grow 2 ft. tall and as wide with clusters of daisy-like flowers in a wide assortment of colors. Typically bloom in late winter or early spring. Does best in well-draining soil and although technically a perennial, most treat it like an annual. Will bloom again in summer if after the spring blooms are spent, the plant is cut back by about 50%. Primarily a cool-weather plant, it will stop blooming during intense summer heat. Needs to be kept moist, but not soggy, and is not considered a drought tolerant plant. Do not allow plant to sit in water as this may lead to root rot.

By | 2016-04-05T02:50:55-07:00 April 5th, 2016|Perennials|0 Comments

Salvia Browning

Your salvia isn't dying - it's just doing what these plants do in the summer after they flower. They go to seed and the flowering stems get brown. Sometimes this browning is made worse by the plant getting hit too frequently with water. (Such as from an automatic irrigation system that comes on more than once a week.) So be sure that the plant is only getting watered ever 6 to 7 days. Cut off all the brown parts, leaving the lower foliage only. In the future you can do this right after it stops flowering, usually in early July. Then plant another perennial, or better yet an annual such as Profusion Zinnias or Blue Horizon Ageratum, near the plant so that those will have the flower power for the rest of the summer and into the fall.

By | 2016-04-05T00:09:48-07:00 April 5th, 2016|Perennials|0 Comments

Elephant Foot Or Pony Tail Palm

Your pony tail palm, Beaucarnia, is often grown as a houseplant where it grows best in bright, indirect light and can get by on very light watering. Outdoors it is hardy to about 25 degrees F. and thrives in full sun with moderate water once established. It looks like it is in a pot within a pot. If so, when you water take it out of the cover pot, and water in the sink and allow it to drain out completely before returning to the cover pot. If the plant sits in water, it may lead to root rot. Also, Beaucarnia are sensitive to salts in the tap water. If the brown tips continue, consider switching to steam iron water available at your grocery store. Do not over water. Water only when the soil feels dry down to the first knuckle.

By | 2017-09-11T15:49:01-07:00 April 4th, 2016|Perennials|0 Comments

Cymbidium Orchid

Your beautiful flowering plant is indeed a Cymbidium orchid of which there are many, many species and cultivars. If you have ever attended an orchid show, you will be amazed at the array of Cymbidiums in all shapes, sizes, colors, etc. As a plant indoors, it needs bright indiirect light, regular water but make sure the water drains out - do not allow the plants to sit in water as this leads to root rot, and feed with a slow release fertilizer formulated for blooming container plants. After you have enjoyed the flowering spikes and the flowers are spent, it would be best to place outdoors in full sun or partial sun. When temperatures dip in winter, that will signal your cymbidium to for flowering spikes again, but does not tolerate frost.

By | 2016-04-03T02:36:15-07:00 April 3rd, 2016|Perennials|0 Comments

Seed Head Of Clivia

We think this is a species of Clivia of which there are several, prized for its pendant clusters of flowers, but all Clivias have strap-shaped foliage, a perennial from tuberous rhizomes. Native to South Africa, it bears primarily orange, red, or yellow clusters of funnel-shaped flowers on stalks that emerge above the clumps of foliage in late winter-spring. Following the spent flowers, seed head berries appear that typically ripen to red-orange or yellow. Does not tolerate much frost and, when grown outdoors, it needs partial to full shade, regular water, and a slow-release fertilizer formulated for blooming plants. It should be watered when the top inch of soil feels dry. Does not like to be transplanted so leave as long as possible.

By | 2016-04-02T09:08:43-07:00 April 2nd, 2016|Perennials|0 Comments

Hosta Damage

It appears that your hosta has some slug damage. If this is all the damage you have this late in the season, you are not doing too badly. (Do an online image search for hosta slug damage to see what we mean.) You can use a slug repellent but the growing season for hostas is just about over as you will probably have frost soon.

There are many different approaches to combating slugs. One is to go out every night after dark with a flashlight and pick them off. Another is to trap them with beer in a dish, however, some say this actually attracts more slugs! Others have good results sprinkling diatomaceous earth in a circle around each hosta. This winter would be a good time to do some research and choose one or more methods to try next spring.

By | 2017-09-11T15:49:02-07:00 April 2nd, 2016|Perennials|0 Comments