Perennials

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Cyclamen

Your plant belongs to the Cyclamen genus of which there are many species and hybrids. A native of Europe, the Mediterranean region and Asia, these plants are prized for their flowers and attractive clumps of green or variegated foliage. Depending on the cultivar, the flowers look like shooting stars or butterflies and come in hues of pink, red, magenta, white or bi-colors. In your area does best in partial shade or filtered light. Water when the top of the soil feels dry. Continue to care for Cyclamen until the foliage yellows and dies back. From tubers, it will go dormant in the summer, but will return in the cooler seasons. These can be tricky to re-bloom: let the bulbs rest in their pots for about a month and then begin watering again.

By | 2016-04-02T06:59:32-07:00 April 2nd, 2016|Perennials|0 Comments

Chewing Insect

We cannot see the details of the insects but it appears they are chewing insects rather than sucking insects. Perhaps some type of beetle?You can spray with an organic control effective against chewing insects such as Bt or Spinosad. Once the leaves and flowers are damaged, they will not recover but so many have been affected, leave them be until more foliage emerges. Bt is a contact insecticide and Spinosad has a 7-10 day residual. Spray Spinosad in the early evening after the bees have returned to their hives. Once the spray has dried on the plant it is safe for beneficials. There are also chemical formulations that are effective controls, but suggest you show your photo or perhaps capture a few in a bottle for a local garden center to confirm their identity and suggest a remedy.

By | 2016-04-02T01:52:29-07:00 April 2nd, 2016|Perennials|0 Comments

Cyclamen

Your plant belongs to the Cyclamen genus of which there are many species and hybrids. A native of Europe, the Mediterranean region and Asia, these plants are prized for their flowers and attractive clumps of green or variegated foliage. Depending on the cultivar, the flowers look like shooting stars or butterflies and come in hues of pink, red, magenta, white or bi-colors. In your area will do best indoors during the winter months where there is bright, indirect light. Water when the top of the soil feels dry. Continue to care for Cyclamen until the foliage yellows and dies back. From tubers, it will go dormant in the summer, but will return in the cooler seasons. These can be tricky to re-bloom: let the bulbs rest in their pots for a month and then begin watering again.

By | 2016-04-01T19:36:57-07:00 April 1st, 2016|Perennials|0 Comments

Colorful Perennials

Although we primarily identify plants, insects and diseases, we can offer a few suggestions for you. Once the moles or voles are no longer invading your garden, make sure you work the soil where you want to plant your perennials with plenty of organic material so that the soil is well-draining and rich with nutrients. And although the following plants are noted for their deer-resistance, if a deer is hungry enough, it will eat anything. There are no deer-proof plants, but a good selection of deer-resistant plants. For a shady area in your zone prized for colorful flowers or contrasting foliage here are a few to consider: hellebores, peonies, Brunnera macrophylla 'Jack Frost' and gold or chartreuse Hakone grass for texture.

By | 2016-04-01T18:22:29-07:00 April 1st, 2016|Perennials|0 Comments

Lupine Problem

Lupines do best in full sun and well draining soil so that its tap root can go deep and regular water, at least one inch of water per week or more during hot, dry conditions. Does not need supplemental fertilizer as lupines do well in nutrient poor soils. If all the growing conditions have been met, look for snails or slugs or inspect the foliage closely for sucking insects such as aphids, scale or mealybugs that suck the nutrients from leaves and branches. If there are snails or slugs use a snali/slug control containing iron phosphate, safe for small pets and children and if sucking insects wash off and if the infestation is extensive, use a horticultural oil recommended by your local garden center. Confirm the problem with your local garden center and recommended control.

By | 2016-04-01T10:01:12-07:00 April 1st, 2016|Perennials|0 Comments

Cymbidium Orchid

Your plants are Cymbidium orchids of which there are many, many species and cultivars. If you have ever attended an orchid show, you will be amazed at the array of Cymbidiums in all shapes, sizes, colors, etc. As a plant indoors, it needs bright indiirect light, regular water but make sure the water drains out - do not allow the plants to sit in water as this leads to root rot, and feed with a slow release fertilizer formulated for blooming container plants. After you have enjoyed the flowering spikes and the flowers are spent, it would be best to place outdoors in a little more sun or partial sun. When temperatures dip in winter, that will signal your cymbidium to form flowering spikes again, but does not tolerate frost.

By | 2016-03-31T06:13:08-07:00 March 31st, 2016|Perennials|0 Comments

Masdevallia Caesia Problem

Very difficult to tell for sure, but from your description you have experience with raising other Masdevallias. Is it in shade or if indoors where there is 500-1500 foot candles (indirect low light where there is slight shadowing) and with temperatures no lower than 45 degrees F., but no higher than 75 degrees? Also water with steam iron water 2-3 times a week, allowing it to dry just slightly before watering again. Black spots can occur due to warm temperatures (although this time of year, it should not be a problem in your area) or a bacterial or fungal problem. You really need to show your orchid to one knowledgeable about Masdevallias or to the person you purchased it from to get confirmation about the reason for this problem.

By | 2017-09-11T15:49:02-07:00 March 30th, 2016|Perennials|0 Comments

Peony Problems

We suspect that it's too late for your peony, but just in case... do NOT fertilize it at this point. Wait for active growth. Right now it's just trying to survive and feeding will cause it to spend its last reserves on new foliage. Water when soil is dry several inches down. Saturated soil will kill the roots, resulting in wilting. Was the soil amended prior to planting? Organic matter will create air spaces and allow for good drainage. Peonies like soil high in humus. Mulch to mitigate soil temperatures and water levels. The sun/shade balance is fine. Peonies need to be planted fairly shallowly, or they will not bloom. You can find more information on growing peonies here: http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/hort/info/inform/flowers/peony.htm

By | 2016-03-29T16:49:40-07:00 March 29th, 2016|Perennials|0 Comments

Cymbidium Orchid

Your plant looks like a Cymbidium orchid of which there are many, many species and cultivars. If you have ever attended an orchid show, you will be amazed at the array of Cymbidiums in all shapes, sizes, colors, etc. As a plant indoors, it needs bright indiirect light, regular water but make sure the water drains out - do not allow the plants to sit in water as this leads to root rot, and feed with a slow release fertilizer formulated for blooming container plants. After you have enjoyed the flowering spikes and the flowers are spent, it would be best to place outdoors in full sun or partial sun. When temperatures dip in winter, that will signal your cymbidium to for flowering spikes again, but does not tolerate frost.

By | 2016-03-29T15:38:05-07:00 March 29th, 2016|Perennials|0 Comments

Davidsons Penstemon

Davidson's Penstemon

Dense mat with creeping woody stems, evergreen. Leaves small, oval, dark green, leathery, hairless. Leaves on flowering stems smaller, bract-like. Flowers 3/4–1 1/2 in. long, blue-lavender to purple, wide tubes usually flattened on the sides, white-woolly hairs on bottom of throat, staminode densely hairy. Var. davidsonii, the only form in California and most of Oregon, has more rounded leaves, large flowers about 1–1 1/2 in. long. Var. menziesii is generally smaller, with leaves broadest at the base, toothed, with short petioles, flowers 1 in. long, blue-violet. Var. praeteritus, endemic on Steens Mountain in southeastern Oregon, is larger, with 1–2 in. flowers, leaves with sharply pointed tips. All prefer rocky, well-drained soils, some sh

By | 2016-03-29T10:53:35-07:00 March 29th, 2016|Perennials|0 Comments