Succulents

/Succulents

Donkey Ears

A fast growing succulent perennial from rocky areas of northwestern Madagascar that grows to 1212"-18" tall and wide with leaves that can be enormous, from 12"-20" long. The leaves are bronze-green covered with a waxy white covering to look overall gray-green and splotched with maroon-brown blotches. These leaves often have small plantlets developing along the leaf margin. The flower spike begins to rise in fall to grow to a 2'-3' tall stalk that branches near the top with several clusters of pale peach-colored buds that darken and become the calyces holding the darker reddish-salmon petals with flared tips and yellow interior. The whole flowering process lasts nearly 2 months at which point the “mother plant” declines but the many plantlets on the leaves develop rapidly to bloom within 2 to 3 years. Great in a hanging baskets or as a specimen or mass planted in a dry garden. Plant in full sun to partial shade.

By | 2016-03-07T09:38:47-08:00 March 7th, 2016|Succulents|0 Comments

Satellite Plant Chinese Dunce Cap

An attractive small succulent from Japan with soft lavender to gray-green leaves in 1"-2" wide open rosettes that offset readily producing small plantlets on spaghetti thin stems that radiate up to 6" away from the mature rosettes to form an open plant to about 1' across. After several years these rosettes can produce tiny pale yellow flowers with greenish bracts on 6" tall spikes that are described as the shape of an inverted ice cream cone, or as the common name implies, like a Dunce Cap. Some say Satellite plant because of all the tiny "satellites" orbiting their mother plant. Flowering often starts in early autumn but may begin as late as November. The flowering rosette dies after flowering but is quickly replaced by the "satellites". Plant in sun or partial shade in a very well-drained porous soil. It is hardy to at least -5°F (some say -35°F) and tolerates infrequent irrigation but looks best when given an occasional to regular watering but does not like to be in wet soil in winter so good drainage is an important requirement.

By | 2016-03-07T05:29:26-08:00 March 7th, 2016|Succulents|0 Comments

Traditional Jade Plant

Your plant is likely a jade plant, Crassula argentea, a popular succulent. Grows well indoors in very bright indirect light or outdoors in full sun, but does not tolerate freezing temperatures. Water when the soil feels dry down to the first knuckle. Do not over-water. Also make sure if in a container has drainage holes. Do not allow plant to sit in water as this may lead to root rot. Common names can be confusing, entertaining, and interesting! Also known as Chinese rubber tree, money plant, or dollar plant, these plants were once thought to bring good luck to their owners so were often given as housewarming gifts. Many people who practice Feng Shui say that having one of these plants in your home, with their roundish leaves like coins, helps to bring money into your life. Also the fact that fallen leaves can readily start new plants is another analogy for increasing wealth and abundance.

By | 2016-03-06T23:19:56-08:00 March 6th, 2016|Succulents|0 Comments

Traditional Jade Plant

Your plant is likely a jade plant, Crassula argentea, a popular succulent. Grows well indoors in very bright indirect light or outdoors in full sun, but does not tolerate freezing temperatures. Water when the soil feels dry down to the first knuckle. Do not over-water. Also make sure if in a container has drainage holes. Do not allow plant to sit in water as this may lead to root rot. Common names can be confusing, entertaining, and interesting! Also known as Chinese rubber
tree, money plant, or dollar plant, these plants were once thought to bring good luck to their
owners so were often given as housewarming gifts. Many people who practice Feng Shui say that having one of these plants in your home, with their roundish leaves like coins, helps to bring money into your life. Also the fact that fallen leaves can readily start new plants is another
analogy for increasing wealth and abundance.

By | 2016-03-06T18:53:35-08:00 March 6th, 2016|Succulents|0 Comments

Agave

Agave potatorum "kiji-jo-kan" is a very unusual, rare color form of agave with striped foliage and rusty thorns. Also known as the “Butterfly Agave” for the shape of the leaves that resemble butterfly wings. The rosettes are wider at the bottom. It may not bloom until it is 10 years old.

Cultivation: Agave potatorum is a relatively easy-to-grow species, though not as cold-hardy as many of the more northerly-occurring species (Winter hardy to around -3° C degrees) But it is best to protect it from frost to avoid disfiguring the foliage. Suited for light shade to full sun, but better with some shade in summer. It needs a very well-drained soil. It grows fairly fast in summer if provided with copious water, but allow to dry thoroughly before watering again (the more water and fertilizer this plant gets, the faster it will grow). During the winter months, one should only water enough to keep the leaves from shrivelling.

By | 2016-03-06T11:54:14-08:00 March 6th, 2016|Succulents|0 Comments

Watch Chain

Crassula lycopodioides, native to Africa, forms spreading clusters of slender stems with densely stacked tiny leaves. Leaves are pointed, light green in color and arranged along the stems like scales. Known as the "Watch Chain". In habitat, Crassulas usually grow in rocky quartz fields so it needs an open, loose soil with fast drainage. Does best in full sun, and water thoroughly when soil is dry to the touch. Water with caution in winter, as the plant can lose its roots if the soil stays cold and wet for extended periods. Protect from frost. There is a lot of argument regarding this plant with some saying that it is a different species, Crassula muscosa, some say that the plant is the same and the other name is just a synonym. Still further, it is a very variable plant and has been named as either one of those names above with a varietal or form name attached. Regardless of all the variations, the care and culture remains the same.

By | 2016-03-04T00:42:56-08:00 March 4th, 2016|Succulents|0 Comments

Royal Red Good Luck Plant

A beautiful rich burgundy cultivar of Euphorbia trigona. The stem is a lovely marbled burgundy with wavy, reddish burgundy margins and some small burgundy leaves during the active growing season. Excellent for use in bright areas of the home or office or as a patio plant in more temperate regions. To maintain the red color of the leaves and enhance the body color, provide more sunshine for this plant by placing it near a sunny window or outdoors in full sun. If the weather is very warm, be sure to water more often to prevent the leaves from falling and the plant from becoming scorched. In time, becomes a much branched shrub to 6' in height. Responds well to warmth, with its active growth period in the late spring and summer months. Porous soil with adequate drainage. Water thoroughly when soil is dry to the touch during active growing season. Requires bright light to full sun for best appearance, and should be given a winter resting period at which time less water should be given. Protect from frost.

By | 2016-03-03T21:35:47-08:00 March 3rd, 2016|Succulents|1 Comment

Pink Nymph

'Pink Nymph' is a hybrid form created by crossing the closely related Mammillaria elongata and Mammillaria microhelia. 'Pink Nymph' is intermediate to the two species, with the silvery spines and pink flowers of the Mammillaria microhelia. The more slender body shape is like Mammillaria elongata. This hybrid was the first "elongata-like" plant with lovely pink flowers, rather than the typical yellow flowers. Flowers throughout late winter and spring. Mammillaria elongata, in habitat, lives in crags between rocky outcroppings in Central Mexico, eventually forming long cascades of stems with pendant offsets. In this habitat, the water drains quickly away from the roots of the plant, never allowing the plant to remain waterlogged. For this reason, it is essential in cultivation to use a very porous soil, which will allow quick drainage. Prefers bright light with ample airflow. Mammillarias prefer bright, slightly diffuse light. Water thoroughly when soil is dry to the touch. Protect from frost.

By | 2016-03-02T04:34:57-08:00 March 2nd, 2016|Succulents|1 Comment

Curling Yucca Leaves

Your plant appears to be a Yucca elephantipes, and is it possibly a recent cutting? Yucca cuttings should have at least a week to dry off before planting. During the time the cutting is developing roots it is not unusual for the leaves to curl as there are no roots bringing water up into the plant. Your soil looks wet. I would suggest two things. First choice, don't water again until the soil has gone almost completely dry, and then water. This might be enough to get the roots working provided they haven't suffered a severe rot. Second, remove the plant from the soil and hose off the root end clean. Give it a week to ten days to just lay around out of direct sun and then plant it up in a new, fresh, well draining soil mix. Give it a good drink and don't water again until the soil is almost dry. This will hopefully have started some new healthy roots. You may still see some leaf curl but it should stop with the new leaves that come out of the center as it starts growing.

By | 2016-02-28T04:40:08-08:00 February 28th, 2016|Succulents|1 Comment

Variegated Corn Cob Euphorbia

Native to South Africa, forms an erect club-shaped stem with squarish tubercles in rows resembling "corn cobs". Branches freely with lateral "club-shaped" offsets. Stems have pinkish-brown persistent thorns that become purplish red with age. Responds well to warmth, with its active growth period in the late spring and summer months. Needs porous soil with adequate drainage. Water thoroughly when soil is dry to the touch during active growing season. Requires bright light for best appearance, and should be given a winter resting period at which time less water should be given. Protect from frost. All Euphorbias contain a white sap that can be irritating to eyes and mucous membranes. If contact is made with this white sap, take care to not touch face or eyes before washing hands with soap and water. The normal form is green. This variegated form shows off shades of pink, white and green all blended together.

By | 2016-02-27T19:44:47-08:00 February 27th, 2016|Succulents|1 Comment