Weeds

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Mussaenda

Mussaendas are members of the Rubiaceae (Madder, or coffee family) and are native to West Africa through the Indian sub-continent, Southeast Asia and into southern China. There are more than 200 known species of Mussaenda, of which about ten are found in cultivation and three are widely used in cultivation. The plant requires full sun to produce abundant sepals but some afternoon shade can be beneficial. Mussadendas can suffer nutritional deficiencies on high pH soils. They are not drought tolerant and will benefit from regular irrigation during the dry months.Enriching the growing site with organic material
helps to conserve soil moisture and provide nutrients to the plant. Remove faded flowers and sepals to prevent possible fungal infection.

By |April 11th, 2016|Weeds|0 Comments

Poison Ivy

We can't say for sure, but it looks like poison ivy. We could use a photo that looked down on the plant instead of toward the side. Until you find out for sure, please don't touch the plant. The adage "leaves of 3, let it be" is important for poison ivy because it can be a clump, shrub or a woody vine. Found most everywhere, it adapts to sun or shade conditions, various soil types, as well as wet or dry environments and can have different leaf shapes. But usually when the plant is young, its stems are a light reddish-green and can be hairy or hairless. When the plant matures more, the stems become brown and woody. If it is growing in your garden as a volunteer, suggest you dig it out as a precaution and wear gloves in case it is poison ivy. Dispose in the trash, not a compost pile.

By |April 11th, 2016|Weeds|0 Comments

Weed

Unfortunately we cannot identify this plant for you at this stage of its development, but we believe it is a weed. If you didn't plant this, chances are its a weed from a wind blown seed or bird dropping. If it is growing in your garden bed we suggest you pull it out so it doesn't compete for light, nutrients and water with your other cultivated plants. If you have the room and want to watch it grow leave it be; just remember once it is done blooming it will begin to drop seed and disperse throughout your garden. Suggest you show your photo and a sample of the plant to a horticulturist at you local garden center or weed specialist at the university cooperative extension service to see if they can help identify for you. If you find out, please let us know as this is how we learn as well.

By |April 8th, 2016|Weeds|1 Comment

Weed Or Wildflower

There is a fine line between a native wildflower or an offspring of a cultivated plant and a weed. If it appeared suddenly amidst your cultivated plants, the chances are good that it is a weed/wildflower. There are many different weeds/wildflowers, but if it is not competing with your established plants, then leave it be if you like it. And if it is competing, then pull it out before it gets established, especially if the seed heads are allowed to mature and disperse. Unfortunately we cannot identify your plant until it develops some additional distinctive characteristics such as flowers, berries, seed heads, but if you did not plant it, chances are good that it has been planted by the wind or a bird and will soon compete with your cultivated plants.

By |April 7th, 2016|Weeds|0 Comments

Field Bindweed

This looks very much like Field Bindweed. If it eventually gets morning glory type flowers in white or pink, we'll know for sure.
Bindweed is considered a noxious wed in many parts of the country (including Colorado). The roots can run underground 12" a day, and any piece of the root can create a new plant. The seeds can lie dormant for decades and then germinate for a new round. It can run under mulch, and the parts that stick up at the edge can generate enough energy to feed all the covered leaves and stems.
Great patience and persistence are required to control this weed by hand. Here are a couple of links that you might find helpful:
http://www.ext.colostate.edu/ptlk/1552.html
http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7462.html

By |April 7th, 2016|Weeds|0 Comments

Yes It Is Poison Ivy

This is poison ivy. The adage "leaves of 3, let it be" is important for poison ivy because it can be a shrub or a woody vine. Found most everywhere, it adapts to sun or shade conditions, various soil types, as well as wet or dry environments and can have different leaf shapes. When the plant is young, its stems are a light reddish-green to red and can be hairy or hairless. When the plant matures more, the stems become brown and woody. In the summer, the leaves tend to have a shiny coat, making it difficult to spray with a product to kill it. Also forms tiny flowers in the summer followed by berries. If it is growing in your garden, we suggest you dig it out and wear gloves. Dispose in the trash, not a compost pile, and do not burn as the toxins will become airborne.

By |April 7th, 2016|Weeds|0 Comments

Poison Ivy

This is poison ivy. The adage "leaves of 3, let it be" is important for poison ivy because it can be a shrub or a woody vine. Found most everywhere, it adapts to sun or shade conditions, various soil types, as well as wet or dry environments and can have different leaf shapes. When the plant is young, its stems are a light reddish-green to red and can be hairy or hairless. When the plant matures more, the stems become brown and woody. In the summer, the leaves tend to have a shiny coat, making it difficult to spray with a product to kill it. Also forms tiny flowers in the summer followed by berries. If it is growing in your garden , we suggest you dig it out and wear gloves. Dispose in the trash, not a compost pile, and do not burn as the toxins will become airborne.

By |April 6th, 2016|Weeds|0 Comments

Weed Or Wildflower

There is a fine line between a native wildflower/plant or an offspring of a cultivated plant and a weed. If it appeared suddenly amidst your cultivated plants, the chances are good that it is a weed/wildflower. There are many different weeds/wildflowers, but if it is not competing with your established plants, then leave it be if you like it. And if it is competing, then pull it out before it gets established, especially if the seed heads are allowed to mature and disperse. If you did not plant it, chances are good that it has been planted by the wind or a bird and will soon compete with your cultivated plants. Suggest you show your photo and some of the clippings to a local garden center/nursery to see if they can identify further for you.

By |April 3rd, 2016|Weeds|1 Comment

Pokeweed

Your plant is pokeweed. It grows up to 10 feet tall and is noted for purple berries that follow white flowers later in summer. Rampant in some areas and certainly a bully in the garden bed, but a valuable wildlife food source and a handsome plant. The berries are poisonous (to humans - birds love them!). It's a stunning plant, and an important resource for wildlife, so you might enjoy having it around for a while, if you can still get in and out that back door... some good info here, along with photos of what it looks like as a young seedling (because we're betting the birds who brought you this one might bring you another - maybe in a more convenient location!): http://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/weedguide/singlerecord.asp?id=270

By |April 2nd, 2016|Weeds|0 Comments

Purslane

This is appears to be a round leaf purslane. Not sure what is occurring on our side, by the photo is indeed blurry, so without a photo of the overall form of the plant, my best guess from the submitted photo is that this is a pink-flowering form of the annual round-leaf Portulaca. If your plant is more shrub-like, I would guess that what you have may be a reblooming azalea. Again, not sure why we are seeing the photo as we are, and we apologize for not being able to be more exact, but we are doing out best with what we are seeing on our side. Feel free to submit another photo of the overall shape of the plant and we are happy try again. Otherwise, you may want to take a photo or sample of the plant to your local garden center. Thank you!

By |April 1st, 2016|Weeds|0 Comments