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Overwatering Or Underwatering

It is hard to tell in the photo what kind of tree that it is. Overwatering and underwatering exhibit the same symptoms. Whatever is going on, the wilting leaves are not receiving the water they need. If it's underwatering, you need to give it more water. If it's overwatering, there could also be some sort of fungal infection going on. That will clog up the water vessels and prevent them from conducting the water that the tree needs. Get under the tree and dig down about 6 inches if you can. You should be able to judge then what your water situation is. Another possibility is that you have very heavy (clay-like) soil and the water is not percolating down through the soil and the tree is sitting in a bathtub like environment and the plant cannot breathe; it is drowning.

By | 2016-03-23T13:18:33-07:00 March 23rd, 2016|Trees|0 Comments

Environmental Stress

This looks like some type of stress. More than one environmental / cultural stress can cause similar symptoms. For example, Avocado trees are very susceptible to excess soil moisture, which damages roots so they cannot function in proper water and nutrient uptake. Sometimes this results in wilting even though there may be plenty of water in the soil. Nutrient deficiencies can also show as different colors in leaves, however some Avos produce new growth that is more tender and sometimes of a different color; the leaf toughens and changes to dark green as it matures. For more help, you might like to take your photo to a local nursery, Master Gardener clinic or Cooperative Extension office. The more details you can supply as to the growing conditions, the better someone can assist you.

By | 2016-03-22T22:17:05-07:00 March 22nd, 2016|Trees|0 Comments

Problems With Dwarf Alberta Spruce

There are a few things that can cause damage such as this to a dwarf Alberta spruce. Spruce spider mites cause areas to first brown and then die. The problem often spreads and can kill a plant. Secondly, winter damage from wind or salt exposure can make a DAS bare on one side as well. Thirdly, any plant that might have been hit with herbicide, salt, household cleaning products, hot water from a sun heated hose etc will experience dieback.

Your plant will likely not regrow needles in the damaged areas. Check for webbing (mites), and look at your other plant, are they damaged on the same side of the tree? If this is the case and there is no webbing it is probably winter damage or environmental damage of some sort. They will unfortunately remain disfigured.

By | 2016-03-22T11:42:35-07:00 March 22nd, 2016|Trees|0 Comments

Ginseng Ficus Bonsai

Your plant likely belongs to the Ficus genus, possibly F. microcarpa also known as F. retusa. Ficus are known for their dramatic roots that survive above ground resembling bulbous structures. It makes an ideal houseplant/bonsai provided there is bright indirect light, regular water, and a slow release fertilizer. Make sure the plant does not sit in water because this may lead to root rot. Out in the patio where winters are mild and where there is filtered light is also fine. Feed with a water soluble organic or slow-release fertilizer formulated for container plants at 1/2 the recommended dilution rate during its growth cycle. Again, make sure you water in the sink and allow to drain out completely before returning to the decorative outer pot or saucer.

By | 2016-03-22T03:21:33-07:00 March 22nd, 2016|Trees|0 Comments

Many Questions

The Ponderosa Pine prefers a different climate than Southern California. It primarily occurs in mountainous regions. It prefers cooler, wetter climates. This tree looks to be a "fish out of water". When a plant is not provided with its optimum growing conditions, it weakens the plant and lessens its ability to fend off diseases and pests. Plus this a young tree without an established root system. Pine trees are evergreen and do not have a dormant period. This tree might do best if relocated to a more mountainous region.
The brown needles are either due to under watering or some type of insect. The white spots you describe could be an insect or a natural part of the plant. If you would like to send in close ups of the white spots, we will be happy to try to ID for you.

By | 2017-09-11T15:49:18-07:00 March 21st, 2016|Trees|0 Comments

Leaf Spot

There are several fungal diseases that cause leaf spot. "Leaf spot" is a common descriptive term applied to a number of diseases affecting the foliage of ornamentals and shade trees. The majority of leaf spots are caused by fungi, but some are caused by bacteria. Some insects also cause damage that appears like a leaf spot disease.Leaf spot may result in some defoliation of a plant. An established plant can tolerate almost complete defoliation if it happens late in the season or not every year. Small or newly planted that become defoliated are more at risk of suffering damage until they become established. Keep the leaves picked up that fall and destroy, Do not compost them. Spray with a fungicide now and when new leaves emerge.

By | 2017-09-11T15:49:18-07:00 March 21st, 2016|Trees|0 Comments

Problems With Dwarf Alberta Spruce

There are a few things that can cause damage such as this to a dwarf Alberta spruce. Spruce spider mites cause areas to first brown and then die. The problem often spreads and can kill a plant. Secondly, winter damage from wind or salt exposure can make a DAS bare on one side as well. Thirdly, any plant that might have been hit with herbicide, salt, household cleaning products, hot water from a sun heated hose etc will experience dieback.

Your plant will likely not regrow needles in the damaged areas. Check for webbing (mites), and look at your other plant, are they damaged on the same side of the tree? If this is the case and there is no webbing it is probably winter damage or environmental damage of some sort. They will unfortunately remain disfigured

By | 2016-03-21T16:11:55-07:00 March 21st, 2016|Trees|0 Comments

Ficus Problem

This looks like it could be a moisture problem-probably too much water but maybe not enough. How often does it get watered? Is the drainage good? Dig around in the soil and see if its wet. This time of year, weekly deep watering should be enough. You may need more as the weather warms. Feed with a slow release or organic fertilizer formulated for container plants. Make sure you also examine the plant for any insect pests but we think this is more of a water or light issue. Ficus need bright indirect light and suggest you rotate the plant periodically so that all parts of the plant receives adequate light. Also, once it is happy in one place, keep it there - if you move it to a different location, it may drop its leaves to adapt to a new site with a different light situation.

By | 2016-03-21T14:44:58-07:00 March 21st, 2016|Trees|0 Comments

Sun Burn Or Lack Of Nutrients

Your citrus is either suffering from sun damage or lack of nutrients. Citrus should actually be grown in full sun all day, so we don't often see sun damage; however if the plant is in shade for part of the day, and then you get intense sun and heat (and/or dry soil or weather) suddenly, it can happen. Otherwise, we recommend keeping the soil evenly moist (only water when the top 2-3 inches of soil is dry) by watering until water drains from the bottom of the pot. Avoid fluctuations in very dry and then very wet soil. Once watering is done properly, if the plant still appears to have yellowing leaves, then you'll want to fertilize with a material formulated for the needs of citrus trees. As your local garden center for an appropriate materials for use in container grown citrus.

By | 2016-03-21T06:04:16-07:00 March 21st, 2016|Trees|1 Comment

Bradford Pear

Your tree looks like an ornamental Bradford (or Callery) pear. If we could see it in bloom, we could be certain but the leaf shape and the fruit look right. Originating from south-eastern China, Korea, Japan and Taiwan, the Bradford Pear has features very similar to the other ornamental pears. An upright shape, the tree has dark green glossy leaves with a color change in autumn. White blossoms appear in spring. As the tree matures the density, of the flowers increase, become more and more spectacular. Unfortunately, these are weak trees and will split easily in high winds or with heavy snow or ice. They are also becoming more and more prone to disease, and so are no longer as strongly recommended for use in landscape gardening.

By | 2016-03-20T07:34:47-07:00 March 20th, 2016|Trees|0 Comments