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Dieback

Typically seen on sheered shrubs, dieback is caused by a variety of diseases and causes the plant to drop it's leaves and the plant becomes "thin." The spores are rain splashed or transmitted by infected shears. If you cut one part of a hedge that was sick and then went another shrub without disinfecting the sheers the spores can be spread. It's good practice to spray clipper blades with Lysol before moving onto another plant. Spray existing plant Daconil and see if it resprouts. If not, prune out dead branches and spray again. If the shrub does bit resprout after pruning the entire plant may have to be replaced. Keep in mind that the fungus will remain in the soil and as a result, you may have to consider removing the entire hedge and replant an alternative selection.

By | 2016-03-22T23:36:06-07:00 March 22nd, 2016|Vine Plants|0 Comments

Clematis

Your plant appears to be a lovely Clematis. Clematis is slow to get established. Often it can be three years before they really start to climb and flower. Clematis grow and flower best in full sun, with their roots mulched or shaded and their faces in the sun. Water regularly and feed with a slow-release or organic fertilizer formulated for blooming plants. If brought indoors during the winter months, provide as much bright light as possible and keep moist but not soggy. Do not allow plant to sit in water as this may lead to root rot. Take outdoors when weather is not longer frosty.
Consult a garden center knowledgeable about clematis or visit: International Clematis Society Homepage
clematisinternational.com/‎ for more information on clematis.

By | 2017-09-11T15:49:18-07:00 March 18th, 2016|Vine Plants|0 Comments

Morning Glory Problem

Usually when there are plenty of lush leaves and no flowers, it can be the result of fertilizing with a high nitrogen food that encourages foliar growth at the expense of flowers. In this case, however, there are a few flowers but some of the lower leaves are yellowing showing only the green venation. Suggest you switch to a slow-release fertilizer formulated for blooming plants or an organic granular fertilizer. Also morning glory plants do best in full sun, at least 6-8 hours, and regular water especially in containers. Inspect the foliage and stems closely to see if there are signs of sucking insects such as scale, aphids or mealybugs as these suck the nutrients from leaves and stems. Suggest you show your photo to a local garden center for confirmation of the problem and remedies.

By | 2016-03-16T16:02:09-07:00 March 16th, 2016|Vine Plants|0 Comments

Bougainvillea

Yes, it is a bougenvilla. A South American native, it does not tolerate much frost but is a fast-growing, vigorous plant that needs a sturdy support such as a wall or fence. Needs full sun and moderate water. Bougainvillea blooms best in nutritionally poor soils.

The soil in this pot looks very compacted. Having well draining soil is a key aspect to allowing for healthy root growth. Does it take a very long time for water to soak in when you water this plant? That could be a key sign there is an issue here. If you find this plant is in extremely compacted soil, we recommend transplanting this into perhaps a larger pot with well draining soil rich in well-developed organic matter.

Being that Lahore only gets an average of 18 inches of rain per year, it may be better to make sure this plant gets a little more water. However, bougainvillea should not get too much water where the soil is constantly wet.

By | 2016-03-10T08:31:31-08:00 March 10th, 2016|Vine Plants|0 Comments

Water And Fertilizer Issues

Sorry for the dealy in responding! These plants are suffering from nutrient deficiency. This could be the result of too much or not enough water. Roots suffering from rot or dryness cannot function sufficiently to carry nutrients into the plant, even if fertilizers are added. Check with your local garden center or agricultural supply store (which may be the better option for this) for an appropriate fertilizer. Keep in mind, we typically see browning of leave edges (margins) in response to under-watering, and/or nutrient excess. Water should be applied when needed (according to weather conditions and plant size) rather than on a fixed schedule. Water deeply fewer times per week as opposed to daily, and maintain even soil moisture (avoid fluctuations in very dry and very wet/flooding of soil). Also, not applying enough water along with fertilizer applications causes the mineral salts to build-up in the soil around the roots, causing root damage and "leaf tip" or "leaf margin" burning.

By | 2016-03-10T04:18:04-08:00 March 10th, 2016|Vine Plants|0 Comments

Passion Flower Vine

The genus Passiflora contains over 400 species, so the common name Passion Flower can be a bit confusing. To muddle matters further, most are vines, but some are shrubs, annuls, perennials and even trees. What they all share are exotic flowers that only remain open for about 1 day. They have a wide, flat petal base with several rings of filaments in the center which surround a stalk of sorts, that holds up the ovary and stamens. Although passion flowers are native in many regions of the southern U.S., they can become a nuisance, to the point of being invasive. Check with your local Cooperative Extension or DEC to see if you should avoid passion flowers altogether or if certain species are preferable. A lot of gardeners prefer to grow their passion flowers in containers. Passion flower grows quite happily in a pot and you have the convenience of being able to move it to a sunnier site or even bring it indoors for the winter. Plus, it limits the spreading by rhizomes.

By | 2016-03-05T01:23:11-08:00 March 5th, 2016|Vine Plants|0 Comments

Hyacinth Bean

This appears to be a Lablab purpureus (Hyacinth Bean) vine grown almost entirely for its attractive flowers and purple seed pods. It's an annual that grows best in full sun with regular moisture. Lablab seeds produce a quick screen on a trellis or fence. Its flowers are beautiful and fragrant which and attract butterflies and hummingbirds, and it even produces edible leaves, flowers, pods, seeds and roots. Dry Lablab seeds are poisonous due to high concentrations of cyanogenic glucosides, and can only be eaten after prolonged boiling. We would not recommend eating it. How To Grow Hyacinth Bean Vine: Many gardeners recommend nicking the Hyacinth Bean seeds with a knife and then soaking the flower seed in water for 24 hours before sowing. Planting Hyacinth Bean seeds can be done directly outside once danger of frost has passed. Lablab typically blooms from mid summer to fall. The Hyacinth Bean herb can be a perennial in frost-free climate zones; however, in other zones it grows as an annual climbing vine.

By | 2016-03-05T01:09:43-08:00 March 5th, 2016|Vine Plants|0 Comments

Passion Flower Vine

The genus Passiflora contains over 400 species, so the common name Passion Flower can be a bit confusing. To muddle matters further, most are vines, but some are shrubs, annuals, perennials and even trees. What they all share are exotic flowers that only remain open for about 1 day. They have a wide, flat petal base with several rings of filaments in the center which surround a stalk of sorts, that holds up the ovary and stamens. Although passion flowers are native in many regions of the southern U.S., they can become a nuisance, to the point of being invasive. Check with your local Cooperative Extension or DEC to see if you should avoid passion flowers altogether or if certain species are preferable. A lot of gardeners prefer to grow their passion flowers in containers. Passion flower grows quite happily in a pot and you have the convenience of being able to move it to a sunnier site or even bring it indoors for the winter. Plus, it limits the spreading by rhizomes.

By | 2016-03-03T19:54:05-08:00 March 3rd, 2016|Vine Plants|0 Comments

Brick And Butter Vine

A bit more information for you. Thunbergia mysorensis (Brick & Butter Vine) is a tropical evergreen vine covered with glossy, dark forest green lanceolate foliage but the most spectacular characteristic are the rich red and yellow, two-lipped flowers that hang down the foliage. Endemic to India, where winter climates are mild, will bloom off and on throughout the year. Does best in full sun or part shade and because of its vigor, provide a sturdy support such as a pergola so that the elongated, pendant blossoms can be easily seen. Needs regular water. Hummingbirds and other pollinators are attracted to its sweet nectar.This plant is considered by many to be one of the most beautiful vines in the world and received the prestigious Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit in 1993. Other common names including Indian Clock Vine, Mysore Clock Vine, Lady Slipper Vine and Dolls Shoes. Enjoy!

By | 2016-02-22T07:22:19-08:00 February 22nd, 2016|Vine Plants|1 Comment

Mandevilla Vine

This is a tropical vine that can be used as a summer annual or house plant in your area. It grows best in full sun and will produce lots of flowers all summer long. It will die when temperatures go below freezing, but you could bring it indoors and keep it as a houseplant, although it probably won't flower either indoors or until late in the summer next season. These plants need specific hours of daylight in order to come into bloom - they are given this at commercial growers but home owners don't tend to supply the artificial lit "long days" turning into shorter days that bring the plant info flower. So many people who overwinter this are disappointed that although the plant lives and grows well once it's outside again, they don't start to flower until sometime in August. If you want one that's going to bloom all summer, buy it fresh from a garden center every spring so it's already flowering.

By | 2016-02-21T07:34:33-08:00 February 21st, 2016|Vine Plants|0 Comments