Succulents

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Crested Euphorbia Lactea

Your plant will need filtered sun or very bright indirect light and wait until the soil dries before watering again. Do not allow the plant to sit in water and handle with care. All parts of the Euphorbia lactea are toxic if ingested and the white sap can cause burns to the skin. If contacted wash immediately with soap and water. The E. lactea is often grafted onto another plant, Euphorbia neriifolia. This is done with crested versions of cacti and succulents as the crested versions are more prone to watering problems and fungal and bacterial problems if grown directly in contact with the soil. This raises them up above their "problem zone", and the stock plant on the bottom furnishes all the necessary water and nutrients.

By | 2016-04-11T23:18:44+00:00 April 11th, 2016|Succulents|1 Comment

Center Stripe Agave Thorncrested Agave

Native to Texas just in the Rio Grande Plains in South Texas, where it grows on gravelly limestone and on cliffs and rocky outcrops. Its leaves are dark green with a lighter green central stripe, and the flowers are a light gray-green to yellow. Like all agaves, it only flowers once after which the original plant dies. Typically most plants are replaced by a number of young "pups" that form around the base. It is hardy to about 10 degrees F. This is a highly variable agave in terms of the leaf color and the striping. There is also a lot of confusion in identity with another species, Agave univittata, which looks similar and comes from the same general region. Likewise there are many brilliantly colored named cultivars of lophantha like Agave lophantha 'Quadricolor'.

By | 2016-04-11T12:44:43+00:00 April 11th, 2016|Succulents|0 Comments

Orchid Cactus

This plant is an orchid cactus. Usually called Epiphyllum but most garden varieties are actually hybrids between Epiphyllum and other cactus genera, hence it may be listed as "Epicactus". It is from the tropics and bears gorgeous flowers in the spring or summer depending on the variety (may take 3-5 years to bloom from a cutting) in filtered light and should be watered regularly. Feed with a slow release fertilizer formulated for blooming plants. Tends to sprawl but that older growth is usually where the flower buds develop. Bring indoors whenever frost is predicted and place in bright indirect light. Best displayed in a large pot or hanging basket to show off the blooms. Individual flowers only last a few days at the most.

By | 2016-04-11T01:34:44+00:00 April 11th, 2016|Succulents|1 Comment

Painted Lady Echeveria

Echeveria derenbergii, native to Oaxaca, Mexico, forms small rosettes with fleshy, light silvery blue leaves with pink tips. Freely offsetting to form clusters quickly. Known as the "Painted Lady". Forms short arching racemes of golden-yellow flowers with orange tips. Great for windowsill or dish garden culture. It is essential in cultivation to use a very porous soil, which will allow quick drainage. Bright light is required to prevent "stretching" of Echeverias ("stretching" occurs when a moderately fast growing plant such as an Echeveria, is grown in dim light or over-fertilized, which causes overly lush growth that contributes to weak, pallid plants). Water thoroughly when soil is dry to the touch. Protect from frost.

By | 2016-04-10T20:48:51+00:00 April 10th, 2016|Succulents|0 Comments

St Anthonys Rick Rack Zigzag Cactus

Native to rainforests of Mexico, this is an epiphytic cactus with flattened emerald green stems that are deeply indented. Flowers are nocturnal and fragrant, appearing in the summer. These lovely flowers have many thin cream colored inner petals, with burgundy outer petals. In habitat, these plants are typically found growing in rich humus in boughs of trees or in crags of rocky inclines. Similar culture as for Orchids. Requires filtered light as do most epiphytes, and prefers a slightly acid soil, with extra organics (such as peat moss provides). Water thoroughly when soil is dry on surface, but should not be allowed to dry out completely. Prefers nighttime temperatures no cooler than 50 degrees F. especially in the winter, and daytime temperatures to 80 degrees F. Protect from frost.

By | 2016-04-10T20:26:01+00:00 April 10th, 2016|Succulents|0 Comments

Spanish Bayonet

This is a full-sun succulent with great architectural value in the garden. Its flower spikes are taller than the plant itself. Water this drought-tolerant plant sparingly. Depending on the species or cultivar some remain 3 ft. tall but others can grow 10-12 ft. tall and 8 ft. wide so be careful about siting it near walls, sidewalks, and irrigation pipes.Once established they are difficult to move. As Yucca mature, their trunks become a bulbous mass and can crack walls, pipes, etc. and the leaves are very sharp. Feed with a slow-release or organic fertilizer only if you want the plant to grow faster. Most species tolerate temperatures below freezing. If this is a Spanish bayonet, it will reach 8 ft. tall or more and almost as wide.

By | 2017-09-11T15:49:00+00:00 April 10th, 2016|Succulents|0 Comments

Blue Puya

Belonging to the Bromeliad family of plants, this succulent is endemic to the Andes of Chile and prized for its stalks of spring blooming brilliant blue flowers and orange stamens. Does best in full sun and is drought tolerant once established. Attracts nectar feeding birds and bees. The particular Puya photographed may be commonly known as sapphire tower, P. alpestris, but we cannot be positive. If it is, the plant forms a 2-3 ft. tall clump or rosettes of foliage that are recurved and light green in color on top and silvery-green underneath. As with many Puyas, the metallic-sheened, turquoise-blue flowers with orange stamens on 3-4 ft. stalks are spectacular in spring, its normal bloom season. Can tolerate short periods of temperatures down to 28 degrees F.

By | 2017-09-11T15:49:00+00:00 April 9th, 2016|Succulents|0 Comments

Tree Grape Namibian Grape

A slow-growing succulent with a huge swollen trunk (caudiciform) and a member of the grape family. These plants occur in Namibia where they are exposed to very dry and hot conditions, and have therefore evolved and adapted very well in order to survive. The presence of white, drooping, papery pieces of bark on the yellow green stems is very typical of this species. In summer this helps to reflect away the sunlight in order to keep the plant cool. Needs full sun and very well-draining soil. As with all succulents, be careful not to over-water. These plants can survive with very little water and too often plants die as a result of too much. Water when soil has become fairly dry and protect from frost. Fruits are somewhat toxic and inedible.

By | 2016-04-09T15:20:36+00:00 April 9th, 2016|Succulents|0 Comments

Yucca

This is likely a yucca, a full-sun succulent with great architectural value in the garden. Its flower spikes are taller than the plant itself. Water this drought-tolerant plant sparingly. Depending on the species or cultivar some remain 3 ft. tall but others can grow 10-12 ft. tall and 8 ft. wide so be careful about siting it near walls, sidewalks, and irrigation pipes. As Yucca mature, their trunks become a bulbous mass and can crack walls, pipes, etc. and the leaves are very sharp. Feed with a slow-release or organic fertilizer only if you want the plant to grow faster. Landscaping with Native Plants of Texas, books.google.com/books?isbn=0760325391, has great info on Yuccas. If you google Yuccas Native to Texas, the pages will come up.

By | 2016-04-07T20:46:02+00:00 April 7th, 2016|Succulents|0 Comments

Crown Of Thorns

Here are a few care tips and information about your crown of thorns plant. Euphorbia milii, is a succulent plant in the same family as the poinsettia, the thorns cover stems that ooze latex sap when cut. This is a common characteristic of euphorbias and is not a sign of disease. Use gloves when handling this plant to protect your skin from both the thorns and the sap. Indoors needs bright, indirect light and water only when soil feels dry to the touch down to the first knuckle. Outdoors provide morning sun and afternoon shade and water sparingly. Does not tolerate frost. Flowers may be red, yellow, pink or white, or even bi-colored depending on the cultivar. Feed with a slow-release or organic fertilizer formulated for blooming container plants.

By | 2016-04-07T14:57:47+00:00 April 7th, 2016|Succulents|0 Comments